Marital Transition and Incidence of Urinary Tract Infections: A Comprehensive Study among Women Aged 18-25 in Bangladesh

Md. Shourav Ali

Department of Public Health, First Capital University of Bangladesh, Chuadanga-7200, Bangladesh.

Sazin Islam *

Department of Public Health, First Capital University of Bangladesh, Chuadanga-7200, Bangladesh.

Sharmin Akter

Central Medical College, Cumilla-3500, Bangladesh.

Md. Shariful Islam

Department of Public Health, First Capital University of Bangladesh, Chuadanga-7200, Bangladesh.

Sarmin Siraj Sormy

Department of Public Health, First Capital University of Bangladesh, Chuadanga-7200, Bangladesh.

Mst. Sharmin Sultana Soby

Department of Public Health, First Capital University of Bangladesh, Chuadanga-7200, Bangladesh.

Umme Sumaya Afrin

Department of Microbiology, Jessore University of Science and Technology, Jessore-7408, Bangladesh.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common health issue, especially among young women. The study aims to investigate the prevalence and determinants of UTIs among newly married women aged 18-25 in Khulna Division, Bangladesh.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 1662 participants from Khulna Division. Data were collected on sociodemographic factors, healthcare access, and UTI history. Chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis.

Results: The overall UTI prevalence was 23.4%, with a significant incidence in the first year of marriage (26.8%) and a 7% rate of recurrent UTIs. Sociodemographic determinants, including age, socioeconomic status, and healthcare access, exhibited significant associations with UTI prevalence.

Conclusion: The study reveals a notable prevalence of UTIs among young married women in Khulna Division, with distinct disparities based on sociodemographic factors. Addressing healthcare access, socioeconomic inequalities, and implementing culturally sensitive interventions are crucial for mitigating UTI prevalence and improving women’s health in the region.

Keywords: Urinary tract infection, prevalence, newly married women, Bangladesh, sociodemographic determinants


How to Cite

Ali , Md. Shourav, Sazin Islam, Sharmin Akter, Md. Shariful Islam, Sarmin Siraj Sormy, Mst. Sharmin Sultana Soby, and Umme Sumaya Afrin. 2023. “Marital Transition and Incidence of Urinary Tract Infections: A Comprehensive Study Among Women Aged 18-25 in Bangladesh”. Asian Journal of Research and Reports in Urology 6 (1):113-18. https://journalajrru.com/index.php/AJRRU/article/view/102.

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