The Management of Post-Catheterization Urinary Tract Infection in Patients with Uncontrolled Diabetes

Anwar Rashed Ahmed Ahmed *

Specialized Medical Care Hospital, UAE.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a frequent complication that follows course after hospitalization in patients. The reason for this lies in the fact that the majority of the patients get catheterized during their stay at the hospital, which adds to the risk of infections ultimately. It was seen that the majority of patients who got infected with UTIs were hospitalized patients with diabetes being the most common ones. In such circumstances, the control of situations in which a patient has an advanced case of diabetes and there are significant obstacles due to the combined effects of the immune weakening features of the disease and catheter-related risks. Patient with uncontrolled diabetes are disposed to UTIs because of their immune status being compromised, neuropathy affecting bladder emptying and high levels of sugar in urine providing a great and conducive environment for bacterial growth. Catheterization provides extra risks as it forms a port for micro-organisms to get to the bladder through where the infection gets a higher chance of infection. For patients with uncontrolled diabetes, the diagnosis of UTI can be different as the body could mask or present atypical symptoms in the off-shoot. In the context of non-traditional signs being less severe (for instance, dysuria and urgency) the diagnosis time will likely be delayed and the treatment deferred. Thus, urine culture and sensitivity are essential as they dictate indecent treatment as a method of management. Optimizing glycemic control is essential in managing post-catheterization UTIs in patients with diabetes. Hyperglycemia compromises immune function and promotes bacterial proliferation, thus exacerbating the risk of infection. Therefore, aggressive management of blood glucose levels through lifestyle modifications, oral hypoglycemic agents, or insulin therapy is crucial in reducing UTI recurrence rates. This review will explore all the reasons that people with diabetes suffer from the atrocities of UTIs, while at the same time, working to reflect upon the current management strategies to deal with this condition as per the current guidelines and recommendations.

Keywords: Urinary tract infections, UTI, diabetes mellitus, immunocompromised, hospitalized patients


How to Cite

Ahmed, A. R. A. (2024). The Management of Post-Catheterization Urinary Tract Infection in Patients with Uncontrolled Diabetes. Asian Journal of Research and Reports in Urology, 7(1), 28–34. Retrieved from https://journalajrru.com/index.php/AJRRU/article/view/115

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